Arts&Health: Promoting well-being through creativity

Av Marthe Haugdal | 12. april 2019

What role can the arts have in facilitating health and well-being? How can engaging in music, writing and other forms of creativity contribute to self-expression and healthy ageing? 

In this mini-seminar researchers within welfare technology, creative writing and neurology will talk about current research projects and discuss different perspectives on the topic.

There will be time for questions and discussion after the presentations. See full programme and more about the speakers below.

Date: Thursday 9 May

Time: 11.30-12.30

Place: The Medicine and Health Library,

Floor 2 in the Knowledge Centre

Øya campus

No registration. The event is free and open to all.

Coffee and tea will be served.

 

Programme:

11.30-11.35: 

Presentation of The Norwegian Resource Centre for Arts and Health 

by Odd Håpnes

11.35-12.30: 

Music and the aging brain. Can music help us age better?

By Joan Vidal Crespi

SENSE-GARDEN: Personalised and immersive spaces for people with dementia

by Artur Serrano

Beyond physical space: Creating environments for emotional connection 

by Gemma Goodall

Writing about the (poetic) nuances of life. Why does it matter for our mental health? 

by Olga Lehmann

12.30-12.45: 

Questions and discussion

 

Abstracts and author bios

The Norwegian Resource Centre for Arts and Health is a national centre based in Levanger. The centre has five partners: Levanger Municipality, Trøndelag County, Nord University, Helse Nord-Trøndelag HF and HUNT Research Center, NTNU. The centre is developing interaction between research, education and practice, and documents and develops song, dance and other expressions of the arts within a professional health and care-giving framework.

SENSE-GARDEN: Personalised and immersive spaces for people with dementia

by Artur Serrano

I will talk about our experience with the SENSE-GARDEN project, where 4 countries are collaborating to create personalised and immersive spaces for people with dementia. These spaces are adaptable rooms, where images, films, surround music and aromas, are combined to create a unique experience to the visitors. An experience that is related to the memories of their own life. These sensorial stimuli will help them to recall emotions from the past, and through these connect with the present and with the ones around them.

Artur Serrano, Professor of Welfare Technology at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences/NTNU, also employed at the Norwegian Centre for for E-health Research. His current main research interests are in interaction between technology and its users, and especially the use of technology in dementia care. Serrano is the founders and leader of NTNU’s ImRo Lab – Immersive Technologies and Robotics Laboratory, experimenting on virtual and physical imagined realities for care technologies, and socialising with robots. He currently coordinates the EU-funded project “SENSE-GARDEN” (http://sense-garden.eu) of which he will be talking about.

Email: artur.serrano@ntnu.no

 

Beyond physical space: Creating environments for emotional connection 

by Gemma Goodall

What do we mean when we talk about space? In her talk, Gemma will share primarily findings from the SENSE-GARDEN project in terms of emotion, self-identity and connection. She will discuss ideas on how personalized, immersive spaces can facilitate self-expression and opportunities for bonding between people living with dementia and their family members.

Gemma Goodall is a PhD candidate at the Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU. She is an artist and musician with a background in music psychology, and her research interests focus primarily on the potential of the arts to benefit people living with dementia. She is currently working as part of an EU-funded project, “SENSE-GARDEN”, on which her PhD is focused. Gemma is also Norway’s representative for the Arts and Health Early Career Research Network.

Music and the aging brain. Can music help us age better?

By Joan Vidal Crespi

Joan Vidal Crespi is a neurology consultant at St Olav’s University hospital and PhD candidate at NTNU. Research focus: facial pain and headache. Studied violin and composition at the Conservatory of Palma de Mallorca.

Writing about the (poetic) nuances of life. Why does it matter for our mental health? 

by Olga Lehmann

In this talk, Olga Lehmann will address some psychological perspectives related to (poetic) writing, such as self-exploration and emotional agility. In particular, she will share some preliminary findings of her research project that focuses on exploring the processes and outcomes of writing courses for older adults in Oslo and Trondheim. Some of these findings relate to motivation, memory, attention and existential meaning.

Olga V. Lehmann, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Mental Health, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology. She is also the Head (and heart) of Health and Compassionate practices at Pracademy, a global innovation training company. She is a poetess, teacher, psychologist and researcher interested in feelings and emotions, silence-phenomena, meditative and contemplative practices, communication, poetic instants, and well-being. She has edited Acompanar la finitud (San Pablo, 2014), as well as co-edited Poetry and Imagined Worlds (Palgrave, 2017), Deep Experiencing: Dialogues Within the Self 2017, SpringerBriefs) and Poesikveld i Trondheim: en antologi (Forlaget Beijing Trondheim, 2017). She runs writing courses for older adults as part of her current research project at NTNU and hosts the poesikveld in Trondheim -an inclusion-through-poetry community initiative.

About the seminar

The seminar is facilitated by The Medicine and Health Library. Contact us at post@bmh.ntnu.no if you want to collaborate, or use the library for events and exhibitions.

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